How to Ship your Artwork- tips from exhibiting artists

Preparing to hang the pieces in Beyond the Surface: Biological Explorations in Wax, our upcoming show, felt a bit like opening presents at holiday time! Several of the artists tapped for this show by guest curator Tracy Spadafora shipped their work, or had it delivered to the gallery by fellow artists. Encaustics can be fragile, although they are much sturdier than they sometimes appear; but every piece of art that is shipped deserves to be treated with utmost care.

We were very impressed by the care and professionalism used by the artists in preparing their work for transport. So much so that we'd like to share with you the tips we learned from them:

1-Pack carefully to protect each piece from shifting in its case. Some work came in boxes which were handmade by the artist to fit the piece exactly. 



















2-Label, Label, Label- This piece by Anne Cavanaugh, Vignette (Patricia), was labeled on the outside of the box, on the inside, and on the back of the piece with ALL the pertinent information. The piece was protected on its way to the gallery, but also, if (ok, let's say when) it sells, the box will be used to deliver the work to the buyer. We were particularly impressed by the 'care of encaustics' information enclosed in multiple places, useful when the work is in transit, but especially when it goes to the collector.

3- Enclose directions- and hardware, if necessary- for hanging. We received magnets in one box, tape in another. One box even included a utility knife!

 Kay Hartung's Microcell series, a grouping of nine 6-inch cradled panels hung in a grid pattern, is shown here. The box included the nine panels, well-padded, special tape, and printout showing the arrangement and orientation of the individual pieces. Best of all, Kay included a template on wax paper (a staple for encaustic artists!) indicating exactly where to place the hanging hardware.

It goes without saying, artists use great care to produce each piece; careful packing and labeling ensures that the work will get to its destination intact, and when it is shown, will be exhibited as it was intended to be seen.

Tracy Spadafora, Cultivate, mixed media encaustic.

Beyond the Surface: Biological Explorations in Wax,
a group show of 2- and 3D work in the encaustic medium
is on exhibit from October 7-November 6, 2011

A Reception will be held on October 22, from 5-7PM